Lemons into lemonade part III: The first parts haul, a quick rear debadge, and inspecting the faulty throttle body hose.

After being surprised by not one but two mechanical failures a couple weekends ago, its time for a much needed brake upgrade. So of course, I ordered a catless downpipe and a short intake that will make your EJ sound like a jet taking off. My state doesn’t test emissions, so it is my solemn duty to experiment with such things on the behalf of those of us who cannot. There are turbos starving in California, you know...

Someone went full animal on this poor box. Word on the street is that this package was 4 days late because FedEx decided that the correct address given to them by fastWRX was no good, so they made up another one. That may have had something to do with it.
The heat shield has a cool shape to it.

Note the difference between the old and new throttle body to intercooler hoses. The one on the right, which was creating a small but irritating boost leak that sounded like a tea kettle, has unfurled. The OE design is notorious for doing this when you crank up the boost, which is exactly what happened here. With a final boost increase on the menu, I wasn’t content with simply tightening the hose clamp on the offending side. That solved the problem, but now that I’ve seen the extent of the issue I’d say that new hose is $70 well spent.

Any EJ owner - or, lets face it, anyone who has been within earshot of an older Subaru - knows those awful heat shield rattles that develop as the cars age. Despite only 75k miles on the clock, there is already this heat shield on the stock downpipe that makes lovely chainsaw noises whenever you get on the throttle from 2-3k RPM. So in addition to the childish flame shooting, diesel truck noises, and extra torque, the downpipe/intake setup should make that awful sound go away too.

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The spacers will be a nice little“while its on blocks” item to take care of (there are many). I ordered a set of 15MM units all around instead of the recommended 15 front/20 rear. These new units are 20s for the rear. Whoops...

The bearing assembly is self explanatory. I haven’t started disassembling the original yet, that has to be saved for a truly nice day. So far,the car has been covered in snow three times for the couple weeks its been off the road... Anyway, the failed caliper probably cooked all of the grease in the original bearing since I drove 300+ miles on it just to get home between the two times it seized up. The bearing went around fifty miles after the caliper did its thing for the second time, which supports that hunch.

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I’m all about about the debadge. There’s something uniquely exciting about a simple visual mod that changes the look of your car, especially when its free and your tools of choice are a hair dryer and some floss. What a strange hobby.

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